Category:meeting victims needs

Information for Canadians harmed in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 1, 2017

FBI Assistance for Victims of the Harvest Music Festival Shooting in Las Vegas:

The FBI Victim Services Division will arrange and pay for repatriation of deceased and injured victims from Las Vegas. They have a large team on the ground in Las Vegas and can help injured victims who need assisted transport or premium class airfare based on medical need, family/companion travel, etc. They can reimburse family members that traveled to Las Vegas. They will also be handling the association and return of personal effects. Individuals who were directly affected can also reach the FBI through this email address: LVFestivalAssist@fbi.gov or at https://www.fbi.gov/…/assistance-for-victims-of-the-harvest… . Victims can enter their information and someone will respond back to them as soon as possible.

Nevada Department of Administration Victims of Crime Program:

Canadians impacted by the Las Vegas tragedy should fill out an application with the  the Nevada Department of Administration Victims of Crime Program. Their contact information is: 702-486-2740 and the email address is applications@voc-net.com

Financial Assistance for Canadians Victimized Abroad:

Canadians who have been the victim of a serious violent crime in a foreign country may be eligible for financial assistance through the Victims Fund. As of April 1, 2007, financial assistance is available to individual Canadians who are victims of specified serious violent crimes in a foreign jurisdiction for serious situations of undue hardship where no other source of financial assistance is available. The Victims Fund may help cover various expenses where the victim has no other source of financial assistance, up to a maximum of $10,000. Visit here to apply or call 1-888-606-5111 or email.

The Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime offers support, research and education to survivors and stakeholders.

What's New

My name is Donna McCully.

It was always our wish to live in Jamaica in our dream home. So, in August 2012, my husband Sedrick Levine and I left Canada to move into our new home. We were thrilled to finally be starting the next chapter in our lives, in Sedrick’s beloved homeland. He bought a little bus and planned to operate tours for visitors to the island. I was helping him run this business venture, as part of our semi- retirement in Jamaica.

My life as I knew it was suddenly shattered when two masked men broke into our home on Sunday, November 17, 2013. Sedrick struggled with the men, allowing me to flee upstairs to call the police. His actions saved my life that day, and that of my father and his housekeeper, who were visiting us at the time. One of the masked intruders chased me upstairs and kicked in the bathroom door, but he stopped when he heard a gunshot from downstairs.

My husband Sedrick was killed that day and the men fled our home with a laptop. The Jamaican police have not yet found these men or charged them with killing my beloved husband. Their motive remains unknown.

This crime has completely changed my life. I suffer from Post-traumatic Stress Disorder now and have depression as a result. I came back to Canada, but I feel very isolated since this happened. These emotional scars may never heal.

I managed to find the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime by searching online one day. I didn’t know where to turn for help when I came home to Canada. The CRCVC has provided me with a lot of emotional support, which has been tremendously helpful. They’ve also written numerous letters to Jamaican officials seeking justice for Sedrick, as well as intervening with Canadian officials on my behalf. The office also helped connect me to a trauma therapist for counselling sessions too.

In order to try and make sense of what happened to Sedrick, it is my hope that others could support the work of the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime. There are so many other victims/survivors out there who also need their assistance.