Category:terrorism

Help for victims of Toronto’s van attack, or who to call if you need help yourself

Information regarding the van incident on Yonge St. between Finch and Sheppard Aves, April 23, 2018

Members of the public who may be concerned their loved ones were involved in the Toronto van attack incident are asked to contact the Sunnybrook Hospital’s family information and support centre at 1-416-480-4940.

Toronto Police have set up a hotline for family and friends of victims at 416-808-8085.

If you need the assistance of Victim Services Toronto, you can call 416-808-7066 or visit http://victimservicestoronto.com/. They are available to help 24/7, with crisis counsellors and volunteers.

What’s Up Walk-In provides free mental health counselling, with no appointment or health card necessary: information on their six Toronto locations can be found at whatsupwalkin.ca.

Can you help?

You can visit blood.ca to find the nearest clinic to donate blood. Canadian Blood Services said it is “closely monitoring the response effort in Toronto to ensure patients affected by the collision receive blood and blood products as needed.”

Both Sunnybrook hospital and North York General are treating victims. Both hospitals take donations.

Islamic Relief Canada has also set up a fundraiser for the families of victims.

Do you have information?

The Toronto Police have created a hotline for witnesses or anyone with information to contact them at 416-808-8750. A web portal has also been created for people to submit photos and videos.

National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Terrorism

Ottawa memorial

June 23, 2016 – The National Day of Remembrance for Victims of Terrorism is marked every year on June 23 in Canada on the anniversary of the bombing of Air India Flight 182 off the coast of Ireland. On this day, flags across Canada are flown at half-mast to honour the victims of the bombing, as well as other acts of terrorist violence that have taken lives of Canadians.  The CRCVC stands in solidarity with all those affected by extremist violence and acts of terrorism. There are memorial ceremonies today across Canada and in Ireland to remember the lives taken too soon:

Montreal
6:30 pm, at Air India 182 Memorial
Monk Island at Lachine Canal (near the Fur Trade Museum)
1255 Saint-Joseph Boulevard
Lachine, Quebec

Toronto
Two memorial services will be held in Toronto:
– 12 noon at Air India 182 memorial on the south lawn of Queens’ Park &
– 6:30 pm at Air India 182 memorial
in Humber Bay Park East, Etobicoke
(South of Lakeshore Blvd at Parklawn Rd)

Ottawa
6:30 pm at Air India 182  memorial
In Commissioner’s Park, near Dow’s lake

Vancouver
6:30 pm at Air India 182 memorial in Stanley Park

Ireland
23 June, 8 am to 9 am – 31st anniversary service at Air India 182 memorial; one minute silence from 8.12 to 8.13 am; followed by prayers by the families present; speeches by dignitaries; refreshments.

The Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime offers support, research and education to survivors and stakeholders.

What's New

My name is Donna McCully.

It was always our wish to live in Jamaica in our dream home. So, in August 2012, my husband Sedrick Levine and I left Canada to move into our new home. We were thrilled to finally be starting the next chapter in our lives, in Sedrick’s beloved homeland. He bought a little bus and planned to operate tours for visitors to the island. I was helping him run this business venture, as part of our semi- retirement in Jamaica.

My life as I knew it was suddenly shattered when two masked men broke into our home on Sunday, November 17, 2013. Sedrick struggled with the men, allowing me to flee upstairs to call the police. His actions saved my life that day, and that of my father and his housekeeper, who were visiting us at the time. One of the masked intruders chased me upstairs and kicked in the bathroom door, but he stopped when he heard a gunshot from downstairs.

My husband Sedrick was killed that day and the men fled our home with a laptop. The Jamaican police have not yet found these men or charged them with killing my beloved husband. Their motive remains unknown.

This crime has completely changed my life. I suffer from Post-traumatic Stress Disorder now and have depression as a result. I came back to Canada, but I feel very isolated since this happened. These emotional scars may never heal.

I managed to find the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime by searching online one day. I didn’t know where to turn for help when I came home to Canada. The CRCVC has provided me with a lot of emotional support, which has been tremendously helpful. They’ve also written numerous letters to Jamaican officials seeking justice for Sedrick, as well as intervening with Canadian officials on my behalf. The office also helped connect me to a trauma therapist for counselling sessions too.

In order to try and make sense of what happened to Sedrick, it is my hope that others could support the work of the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime. There are so many other victims/survivors out there who also need their assistance.