Every 6 days a woman in Canada is killed by her intimate partner. Action is needed!

The CRCVC mourns the recent homicides of Carol Culleton, Anastasia Kuzyk, and Nathalie Warmerdam, outside of Ottawa, in Wilno, Ontario. All are believed to be killed within hours of each other on September 22, 2015 by Basil Borutski, their former intimate partner, who has since been charged with first-degree murder. Since their tragic deaths, two other women have perished at the hands of former or current partners. In Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, the family of Colleen Sillito, who was shot by a former boyfriend in a murder-suicide October 2nd, wants the provincial government to call a public inquiry. In Manitoba, 20-year-old Selena Rose Keeper was found bleeding to death outside a Winnipeg home October 8th. She loved and feared the man who has been charged in her death, her sister says. It is also reported that she was denied a protection order.

The lives of these women mattered, yet in this country women continue to be killed —one every six days nationally—without much ado. Indigenous women continue to face indifference with the number of girls and women stolen now tallying more than one thousand. The topic of violence against women is not a major election issue, even though it should be.

Men like Borutski are not “unstoppable”; in fact, violence against women is preventable. Professor Irvin Waller reminds us that the World Health Assembly (which has oversight of the World Health Organization) adopted in 2014 a milestone resolution on the role of the health sector in preventing violence against women.

We know how to prevent these crimes. The Ontario Domestic Violence Death Review Committee reviews deaths of persons that occur as a result of domestic violence, and makes recommendations to help prevent such deaths in similar circumstances. Waller states, “Among the priorities must be partnerships between police, health, social services and others that are essential to providing for prevention and the greatest protection to possible victims. Another priority is funding social investment in reducing the well established risk factors, including mental illness, as well as to support victims and their children, particularly in rural areas where the home and livelihood are interconnected.”

Borutski somehow evaded the criminal justice system for the crimes he committed against his partners. While he was convicted of causing property damage, assault police and failure to provide a breath sample, the serious charges for threatening his ex-wife with death and assaulting her, for assaulting Warmerdam, for criminal harassment of a fifth woman and for assault against a sixth, were all stayed by Crown prosecutors. Professor Elizabeth Sheehy says “the criminal justice system completely failed to appropriately condemn Borutski’s violence or to capture the acute endangerment his victims faced. And without convictions for serious crimes of violence he could not have been designated the “dangerous offender” that he appears to be.” She is right and this happens too commonly in domestic violence cases across Canada.

Too many women in Canada are living in fear of current or ex-partners. Many use monitoring devices and safety plans to try to keep safe. Escaping violence is not easy, especially where children are involved. Let’s call on our elected officials to take the epidemic of violence against women in Canada seriously. We can combat it together by mobilizing feminist organizations and addressing it as a major public health concern.

The Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime offers support, research and education to survivors and stakeholders.

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My name is Donna McCully.

It was always our wish to live in Jamaica in our dream home. So, in August 2012, my husband Sedrick Levine and I left Canada to move into our new home. We were thrilled to finally be starting the next chapter in our lives, in Sedrick’s beloved homeland. He bought a little bus and planned to operate tours for visitors to the island. I was helping him run this business venture, as part of our semi- retirement in Jamaica.

My life as I knew it was suddenly shattered when two masked men broke into our home on Sunday, November 17, 2013. Sedrick struggled with the men, allowing me to flee upstairs to call the police. His actions saved my life that day, and that of my father and his housekeeper, who were visiting us at the time. One of the masked intruders chased me upstairs and kicked in the bathroom door, but he stopped when he heard a gunshot from downstairs.

My husband Sedrick was killed that day and the men fled our home with a laptop. The Jamaican police have not yet found these men or charged them with killing my beloved husband. Their motive remains unknown.

This crime has completely changed my life. I suffer from Post-traumatic Stress Disorder now and have depression as a result. I came back to Canada, but I feel very isolated since this happened. These emotional scars may never heal.

I managed to find the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime by searching online one day. I didn’t know where to turn for help when I came home to Canada. The CRCVC has provided me with a lot of emotional support, which has been tremendously helpful. They’ve also written numerous letters to Jamaican officials seeking justice for Sedrick, as well as intervening with Canadian officials on my behalf. The office also helped connect me to a trauma therapist for counselling sessions too.

In order to try and make sense of what happened to Sedrick, it is my hope that others could support the work of the Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime. There are so many other victims/survivors out there who also need their assistance.