Category:awareness initiative

5 Ways to Say #WeBelieveSurvivors on March 24th

On Thursday, March 24th, the verdict in the Jian Ghomeshi sexual assault trial will be delivered. Join us in solidarity to support the women who bravely testified, the countless others who could not go to the police, and people who have lived through sexual violence in our communities. Let’s create a space to remind ourselves and others impacted by sexual violence that we believe, support, and love survivors. No matter the outcome of the trial, we support people who have lived through violence.

Five Ways You Can Get Involved on the Day of the Verdict, Thursday March 24th 2016

  1. Post Selfies to Support Survivors online on March 24th with the hashtag #IBelieveSurvivors or #WeBelieveSurvivors. Show survivors that they are not alone. Show the world that we don’t believe victim blaming and myths about sexual violence; We believe survivors. Let’s flood social media with messages of love and support for survivors! For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/190664507966931/
  2. Host a Self Care Crafternoon in your Community to create spaces to collectively come together. We’ll bring the crafts, you bring the feelings. We have a FREE PDF of “We Believe You” A Colouring Book for Survivors & Supports for you to use. Email farrah.khan@ryerson.ca for your copy.  Take a peek at a example event: https://www.facebook.com/events/975489709199325/

In the Toronto Area!

  1. Join Rally & March at Old City Hall 60 Queen Street West, Toronto Thursday March 24 6-8 pm. Family friendly event, all genders welcome. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/1190762947600867/
  2. Participate in Court Solidarity on March 24th with a Creative Intervention at 8:00 am – 10 am at Old Old City Hall 60 Queen Street West. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/361628807341066/
  3. Most importantly Check in with the Survivors in Your Life By:
    • Practicing community care: Check in with people around you, follow their lead and ask what they need. Maybe it’s a Beyonce dance party, dropping off a meal, or sending pictures of cute animals. Don’t make assumptions, LISTEN. They may not want to talk at all, you can hold space, not talk.
    • Being Prepared: People you care about might disclose that they are survivors of sexual violence be it harassment, assault or rape. Listen, believe, remind them it’s not their fault, that they have the right to be safe and they are not alone. You can share resources i.e. Ontario Coalition of Rape Crisis Centres, Assaulted Women’s Helpline, Fem’aide, Support Services for Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse
    • Respecting Boundaries: People may not want to talk about the trial or about sexual violence at all. It’s not survivors job to educate you on sexual violence myths or share information about what we were subjected to. Do your own homework on the issues.

This is a Collaboration Between:

– Canadian Federation of Students, Ontario

– Centre for Women and Trans People, Ryerson University

– Centre for Women and Trans People, UTSC

– Office of Sexual Violence Support and Education, Ryerson University

– Sacha Hamilton: Sexual Assault Centre (Hamilton & Area)

– Toronto Rape Crisis Centre, Multicultural Women Against Rape.

– York University Federation of Students

Questions? Want to list your event or to endorse rally & march please email ovse@ryerson.ca

Are Ontarians apathetic to domestic violence?

New study by Interval House shows 24% blame the victim and only 58% would intervene if abuse disclosed.

March 4, 2015 – While some recent celebrity abuse cases have increased public interest in and dialogue about violence against women, a recent poll commissioned by Interval House has concerning findings.

The poll, hosted on the Angus Reid Forum, revealed that nearly a quarter (24%) of Ontarians believe that it is possible for someone to bring abuse upon themselves.  This belief is higher among men (34.3%) than among women (14.1%). Victim-blaming accounts for why many women have trouble leaving an abusive relationship because they fear they will be blamed, not believed or have internalized that it is somehow their fault. “Abuse is always the responsibility of the abuser” says Renee Weekes, Chair of the Board of Directors at Interval House. “There is no action or choice by a victim that can justify abuse. Women who experience violence need to know that abuse is never their fault and that there are resources in the community to support them.”

The Interval House study also showed that only 58.3% of Ontarians would consider intervening in an abusive situation if someone told them that their spouse or partner was abusive. Domestic violence is still largely kept behind closed doors and many people may still think that what happens in a relationship is not their business. “It’s shocking for us to see that only 58.3% of our neighbours would consider helping if someone in their life came forward and disclosed abuse,” says Weekes, “Our community must begin to move to an attitude of zero tolerance for violence and empathy for victims if we ever want to see an end to the private hell experienced by so many women.”

Other findings in the study revealed:

  • Only 55.8% would intervene in an abusive situation if they saw bruises or injures and suspected the spouse was the cause but 75.8% would intervene if they personally witnessed abuse.
  • 17.1% of Ontarians don’t believe it’s ever their place to interfere if they suspect abusive behaviour is going on.
  • A third (33.5%) of Ontarians would not know what to do if they suspected abuse.

The CRCVC is calling upon Canadians to raise your voice in ending violence against women, as we approach International Women’s Day on March 8th.  We agree that we can make social change if we raise our voices to alter attitudes about the acceptability and responsibility of abuse. Join Interval House’s #StopVAW social media campaign which encourages everyone to use the #StopVAW hashtag while posting a selfie with a stop sign to reignite the conversation and raise awareness. Other actions you can take to #StopVAW can be found at www.intervalhouse.ca/stopvaw

The Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime offers support, research and education to survivors and stakeholders.

What's New

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    Read our call to action asking Canada’s political party leaders about how they will support victims of crime in the upcoming election.

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    Read our letter to House Leaders to join our call to action and undertake a legislated review of the Canadian Victims Bill of Rights.

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    Given the five-year anniversary of Bill C-32: Canadian Victims Bill of Rights (CVBR), please read the letter we have sent to all MPs across Canada as we try to make sure the mandated Parliamentary review will take place.

  • :

    We have responded to the Honourable Doug Downey, regarding VQRP+ cuts. Read it here. (Our original letter is here and his response can be found here.)

     

  • :

    Read the response we received, regarding our letter to the Hon. Mark Furey, Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Nova Scotia concerning support for victims of the mass shooting of April 18-19, 2020 in Portapique, NS.

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